Wrongful termination suit filed against Wells Fargo

A class-action lawsuit was recently filed against the bank Wells Fargo in California, alleging unjust firing. According to former Wells Fargo employees who filed the suit, they were terminated or mistreated in other ways if they did not meet strict bank sales quotas. This led many employees to open millions of bogus consumer accounts, which in turn led to investigations, lawsuits and fines from various federal and state authorities. Whenever a person is a victim of wrongful termination, he or she has the right to take legal action against his or her former employer.

In the recent out-of-state case, Wells Fargo is accused of engaging not only in wrongful firing but also illegal business practices by not paying wages and overtime as well as giving penalties to employees. The employees in their lawsuit claimed that they were penalized for failing to make quotas for sales over the past decade. Two workers claimed that they had to open 10 accounts per day, and they also had to turn in progress reports multiple times a day.

The former workers claimed that the sales quotas were impossible and unrealistic unless they resorted to fraud. Those who could not meet the goals reportedly experienced embarrassment, anxiety and humiliation. In the lawsuit, the former employees are seeking damages totaling $2.6 billion.

Every wrongful termination case is different, so an understanding of what must be proved in one's particular case is likely necessary in order to prevail in that case. Depending on the basis for a person's claim in California, the damages and remedies he or she might recover vary. It is wise for a person who believes that he or she has been wrongfully fired to act quickly in order to preserve his or her rights associated with the termination of his or her employment.

Source: consumerist.com, "Former Wells Fargo Employees Sue Bank For $2.6B, Claiming Wrongful Termination", Ashlee Kieler, Sept. 26, 2016

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